APBS

Books and Chapters Dedicated to Positive Behavior Support

The references or source material associated with this website do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Association for Positive Behavior Support (APBS) nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by APBS.

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  • Albin, R. W., Dunlap, G., & Lucyshyn, J. M. (2002). Collaborative research with families on positive behavior support. In J. Lucyshyn, G. Dunlap, & R. W. Albin, (Eds.), Families and positive behavior support: Addressing problem behaviors in family contexts (pp. 373-389). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Albin, R. W., & Horner, R. H. (1988). Generalization with precision. In R. H. Horner, G. Dunlap, & R. L. Koegel (Eds.), Generalization and maintenance: Lifestyle changes in applied settings. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Albin, R. W., Lucyshyn, J. M., Horner, R. H., & Flannery, K. B. (1996). Contextual fit for behavior support plans. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 81-98). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Alberto, P. A., & Troutman, A. C. (2009). Applied behavior analysis for teachers (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

  • Albin, R. W., Lucyshyn, J. M., Horner, R. H., & Flannery, K. B. (1996). Contextual fit for behavior support plans. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 81-98). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Anderson, J., Albin, R., Mesaros, R., Dunlap, G., & Morelli-Robbins, M. (1993). Objectives and processes of comprehensive training in community-referenced behavior management. In J. Reichle & D. Wacker (Eds.), Communicative approaches to the management of challenging behavior (pp. 363-406). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Anderson, C. M., Bahl, A. B., & Kincaid, D. W. (1999). A person-centered approach to providing support to an adolescent with a history of parental abuse (pp. 385-396). In J. R. Scotti & L. H. Meyer (Eds.), Behavioral intervention: Principles, models and practices. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Anderson, J. L., Russo, R., Dunlap, G., & Albin, R. W. (1996). A team training model for building the capacity to provide positive behavioral supports in inclusive settings. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 467-490). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

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  • Baker, D. J., Blumberg, R., & Freeman, R. (2002). Considerations for functional assessment of problem behavior among persons with developmental disabilities and mental illness. In J. Jacobson, J. Mulick, & S. Holburn (Eds.), Programs and services for people with dual developmental and psychiatric disabilities (pp. 51-66). Kingston, NY: NADD.

  • Baker, S. K., Kame'enui, E. J., Simmons, D. C., & Simonsen, B., (2007). Characteristics of students with diverse learning and curricular needs. In M. Coyne, E. J., Kame'enui, and D. Carnine (Eds.), Effective teaching strategies that accommodate diverse learners (3rd Ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill Publishing Company.

  • Bambara, L. M., Dunlap, G., & Schwartz, I. S. (2004). Positive behavior support: Critical articles on improving practice for individuals with severe disabilities. TASH, ProEd.

  • Bambara, L. M., & Kern, L. (2005). Individualized supports for students with problem behaviors: Designing positive behavior support plans. New York: Guilford Press.

  • Bambara, L., & Knoster, T. (1998). Designing positive behavior support plans. Innovations (no. 13). Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Bergan, J. R. (1977). Behavioral consultation. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

  • Bergan, J. R., & Kratochwill, T. R. (1990). Behavioral consultation and therapy. New York: Plenum.

  • Biglan, A. (1995). Changing cultural practices: A contextual framework for intervention research. Reno, NV: Context Press.

  • Bijou, S., & Baer, D. M. (1961). Child development: Vol. I. A systematic and empirical theory. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

  • Bradley, R., Danielson, L. C., & Hallahan, D. P. (2002). Identification of learning disabilities: Research to practice. Washington, DC: Lawrence Erlbaum.

  • Brotherson, M. J., Turnbull, A. P., Summers, J. A., & Turnbull, H. R. Fathers of disabled children. In B. Robinson & R. Barrett (Eds.), The developing father: Emerging roles in contemporary society. New York: Guilford Press.

  • Burchard, J. D., Bruns, E. J. & Burchard, S. N. (2002). The wraparound approach. In B. Burns & K. Hoagwood (Eds.), Community treatment for youth: Evidence-based interventions for severe emotional and behavioral disorders. New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Burns, B. J., & Goldman, S. K. (1999). Promising practices in wraparound for children with serious emotional disturbance and their families. Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 1998 series, Volume IV. Washington DC: Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, American Institutes for Research.

  • Burrow-Sanchez, J. & Hawken, L. (2007). Student substance abuse: Effective practices for school prevention and intervention. New York: Guilford Press.

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  • Carr, E. G., Carlson, J. I., Langdon, N. A., Magito-McLaughlin, D., & Yarbrough, S. C. (1999). Two perspectives on antecedent control: Molecular and molar. In J. K. Luiselli & M. J. Cameron (Eds.), Antecedent control: Innovative approaches to behavioral support (pp. 3-28). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Carr, E. G., & Durand, V. M. (1985). The social communicative basis of severe behavior problems in children. In S. Reiss & R. R. Bootzin (Eds.), Theoretical issues in behavior therapy (pp. 220-254). New York: Academic Press.

  • Carr, E. G., Horner, R. H., Turnbull, A. P., Marquis, J. G., Magito McLaughlin, D., McAtee, M. L., ... Doolabh, A. (1999). Positive behavior support for people with developmental disabilities: Research synthesis (American Association on Mental Retardation Monograph Series). Washington, D.C.: American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Carr, E. G., Levin, L., McConnachie, G., Carlson, J. I., Kemp, D. C., & Smith, C. E. (1994). Communication-based intervention for problem behavior: A user's guide for producing positive change. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Carr, E. G., McConnachie, G., Levin, L., & Kemp, D. C. (1993). Communication-based treatment of severe behavior problems. In R. Van Houten & S. Axelrod (Eds.), Behavior analysis and treatment (pp. 231-267). New York, NY: Plenum Press.

  • Carr, E. G., Reeve, C. E., & Magito-McLaughlin, D. (1996). Contextual influences on problem behavior in people with developmental disabilities. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 403-423). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Clark, E. R. (1988). The state of the art in research on teacher training models with special reference to bilingual education teachers. Washington, DC: National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition.

  • Colvin, G. (2004). Managing the cycle of acting-out behavior in the classroom. Eugene, OR: Behavior Associates.

  • Colvin, G. (2007). 7 steps for developing a proactive schoolwide discipline plan: A guide for principals and leadership teams. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

  • Colvin, G. (2009). Managing noncompliance and defiance in the classroom: A road map for teachers, specialists, and behavior support teams. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

  • Colvin, G., & Sugai, G. M. (1988). Managing escalating behavior. Eugene, OR: Behavior Associates.

  • Conroy, M. A. (Ed.) (2003). Prevention and early intervention for young children at risk for emotional or behavioral disorder. Reston, VA: CCBD.

  • Conroy, M. A., Brown, W. H., & Olive, M. L. (2008). Social competence interventions for young children with challenging behavior. In W. H. Brown, S. L. Odom, & S. R. McConnell (Eds.), Social competence of young children: Risk, disability, and evidence-based practices (2nd ed.) (pp. 205-231). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Conroy, M., Hendrickson, J. M., & Hester, P. P. (2004). Early identification and prevention of emotional and behavioral disorders. In R. Rutherford, M. Quinn, & S. Mathur (Eds.), Handbook of research in behavior disorders. (pp. 199-215). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Crone, D. A., & Horner, R. H. (2003). Building positive behavior support systems in schools: Functional behavioral assessment. New York: Guilford.

  • Crone, D. A., Horner, R. H., & Hawken L. S. (2004). Responding to problem behavior in schools: The behavior education program. New York: Guildford.

  • Crossland, K., Dunlap, G., Hewitt, B. C., & Neff, B. (2009). Delivering support in the foster care system. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. H. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp. 279-304). New York: Springer.

  • Cuvo, A. J., & Davis, P. K. (1999). Establishing and transferring stimulus control: teaching people with developmental disabilities. In J. K. Luiselli & M. J. Cameron (Eds.), Antecedent control: Innovative approaches to behavioral support (pp. 347-369). Baltimore: Brookes.

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  • Donovan M. S., & Cross, C. T. (2002). Minority students in special and gifted education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

  • Duchnowski, A., & Kutash, K. (2009). Integrating PBS, mental health services, and family driven care. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. H. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp. 203-231). New York: Springer.

  • Dunlap, G. (1993). Promoting generalization: Current status and functional considerations. In R. Van Houten & S. Axelrod (Eds.), Behavior analysis and treatment (pp. 269-296). New York: Plenum.

  • Dunlap, G., & Carr, E. G. (2007). Positive behavior support and developmental disabilities: A summary and analysis of research. In S. L. Odom, R. H. Horner, M. Snell, & J. Blacher (Eds.), Handbook of developmental disabilities. New York: Guilford Publications.

  • Dunlap, G., & Fox, L. (2009). Positive behavior support and early intervention. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp. 49-72). New York: Springer.

  • Dunlap, G., Harrower, J., & Fox, L. (2005). Understanding the environmental determinants of problem behaviors. In L. Bambara & L. Kern (Eds.), Individualized supports for students with problem behaviors. (pp. 25-46). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Dunlap, G., Iovannone, R., English, C., Kincaid, D., Wilson, K., Christiansen, K., et al. (2010). Prevent-Teach-Reinforce: A school-based model of positive behavior support. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

  • Dunlap, G., Iovannone, R. & Kincaid, D. (2008). Essential components for effective educational programs. In J. Luiselli, D. C. Russo, W. P. Christian, & S. M. Wilczynski (Eds.), Effective practices for children with Autism: Educational and behavior support interventions that work (pp. 111-136). New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Dunlap, G., & Kern, L. (1993). Assessment and intervention for children within the instructional curriculum. In J. Reichle & D. P. Wacker (Eds.), Communicative alternatives to challenging behavior: Integrating functional assessment and intervention strategies (pp. 177-203). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Durand, V. M. (1990). Severe behavior problems: A functional communication training approach. New York: Guilford Press.

  • Durand, V. M. (1998). Sleep better!. Baltimore: Brookes.

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  • Eber, L. (2003). The art and science of wraparound: Completing the continuum of schoolwide behavioral support. Bloomington, IN: Forum on Education at Indiana University.

  • Eber, L. (2005). The wraparound process. In M. Hersen, G. Sugai, & R. H. Horner (Eds.), Encyclopedia of behavior modification and cognitive behavior therapy, Volume 3: Educational Applications. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

  • Eber, L., & Keenan, S. (2004). Collaboration with other agencies: Wraparound and systems of care for children and youths with emotional and behavioral disorders. In R. B. Rutherford, M. M. Quinn, & R. Sathur (Eds.). Handbook of research in emotional and behavioral disorders (pp. 503-516). NY: Guilford Press.

  • Epstein, M. H., Kutash, K., & Duchnowski, A. (Eds.). (1998). Outcomes for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders and their families: Programs and evaluation best practices. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

  • Epstein, M. H., & Walker, H. M. (2002). Special education: Best practices and First Step to Success. In B. J. Burns & K. Hoagwood (Eds.), Community treatment for youth: Evidence-based interventions for severe emotional and behavioral disorders (pp. 179-197). New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Erwin, E., Soodak, L., Winton, P., and Turnbull, A. (2001). "I wish it wouldn't all depend upon me": Research on families and early childhood inclusion. In M. J. Guralnick (Ed.), Early childhood inclusion: Focus on change (pp. 127-158). Baltimore: Brookes.

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  • Feeney, T., & Ylvisaker, M. (1997). A positive, communication-based approach to challenging behavior after TBI. In A. Glang, G. Singer, & B. Todis (Eds.), Students with acquired brain injury: The school's response (pp. 229-254). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Felce, D., & Perry, J. (1995). Assessment of quality of life. In R. L. Schalock (Ed.), Quality of life Vol. 1: Conceptualization and measurement (pp. 91-104). Washington DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Fletcher, J. M., Lyon, G. R., Barnes, M., Stuebing, K. K., Francis, D. J., Olson, R. K., & Shaywitz, S. E. (2002). Classification of learning disabilities: An evidence-based evaluation. In R. Bradley, L. Danielson, & D. P. Hallahan (Eds.), Identification of learning disabilities: Research to practice (pp. 185-250). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

  • Fox, L., Benito, N., & Dunlap, G. (2002). Early intervention with families of young children with Autism and behavior problems. In J. M. Lucyshyn, G. Dunlap, & R. W. Albin, (Eds.), Families, family life, and positive behavior support: Addressing the challenge of problem behavior in family contexts (pp. 251-269). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Fox, L. & Dunlap, G. (2006). Evidence-based practices for young children with and at-risk for social-emotional or behavioral problems. In J. Knitzer, R. Kaufman, & D. Perry (Eds.), Early childhood mental health system of care (pp. 313-334). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Fox, L., & Hemmeter, M. L. (2009). A program-wide model for supporting social emotional development and addressing challenging behavior in early childhood settings. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp. 177-202). New York: Springer.

  • Fox, L., Vaughn, B. J., & Dunlap, G. (2002). Research partnership: One family's experience with positive behavior support. In J. Lucyshyn, G. Dunlap, & R. W. Albin (Eds.), Families and positive behavior support: Addressing problem behaviors in family contexts (pp. 417-437). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Freeman, R. L., Baker, D., Horner, R. H., Smith, C., Britten, J., & McCart, A. (2002). Using functional assessment and systems-level assessment to build effective behavioral support plans. In K. C. Lakin & N. Wieisler (Eds.), Alternative community behavioral support and crisis response programs (pp. 199-224). [Monograph]. American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Freeman, R. L., Horner, R. H., & Reichle, J. (2002). Functional assessment and self-restraint (Chapter 6). In S. Schroeder, M. L. Oster-Granite, & T. Thompson (Eds.), Self-injurious behavior: Gene-brain-behavior relationships (pp. 105-118). Washington, DC: APA Books.

  • Freeman, R., Lohrmann, S., Irvin, L. K., Kincaid, D., Vossler, V., & Ferro, J. (2009). Systems change and the complementary roles of inservice and preservice training in school-wide positive behavior support (pp. 599-626). In G. Sugai, R. Horner, G. Dunlap, & W. Sailor (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support. Secaucus, NJ: Springer.

  • Frey, A., & Walker, H. (2005). Education policy for children, youth, and families. In J. M. Jenson & M. W. Fraser (Eds.), Social policy for children and families: A risk and resilience perspective (pp. 67-81). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
    www.sagepub.com/upm-data/5976_Chapter_3_Jenson_Fraser__I_Proof_2.pdf

  • Friesen, B. J., & Stephens, B. (1998). Expanding family roles in the system of care. In M. H. Epstein, K. Kutash, & A. Duchnowski (Eds.), Outcomes for children and youth with behavioral and emotional disorders and their families (pp. 231-260). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed

  • Fox, L. & Dunlap, G. (2006). Evidence-based practices for young children with and at-risk for social-emotional or behavioral problems. In J. Knitzer, R. Kaufman, & D. Perry (Eds.), Early childhood mental health system of care (pp. 313-334). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Fuchs, L. S. (1989). Evaluating solutions: Monitoring progress and revising intervention plans. In M. R. Shinn (Ed.), Curriculum-based measurement: Assessing special children, 153-181. New York: Guilford Press.

  • Fullan, M. (1999). Change forces: The sequel. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

  • Fullan, M. (2003). Change forces with a vengeance. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

  • Fullan, M. (2005). Leadership and sustainability. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

  • Fullan, M. & Stiegelbauer, S. (1991). The new meaning of educational change. New York: Teachers College Press.

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  • George, H. P., Kincaid, D., & Pollard-Sage, J. (2008). Primary-tier interventions and supports. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp.375-394). New York: Springer.

  • Golly, A. (2006). Five universal principles of positive behavior support and the story of my life. Verona, WI: IEP Resources.

  • Good, R. H., Gruba, J., & Kaminski, R. A. (2002). Best practices in using dynamic indicators of basic early literacy skills (DIEBLS) in an outcomes-driven model. In A. Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology IV, (pp. 669-720). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

  • Gresham, F. M. (2002). Responsiveness to intervention: An alternative approach to the identification of learning disabilities. In R. Bradley, L. Danielson, & D. P. Hallahan (Eds.), Identification of learning disabilities: Research to practice (pp. 467-519). Mahwah, N.J.: Erlbaum.

  • Gresham, F. M., & Kern, L. (2004). Internalizing behavior problems in children and adolescents. In R. B. Rutherford, Jr., M. Magee Quinn, & S. R. Mathur (Eds.), Handbook of research in emotional and behavioral disorders (pp. 262-281). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Grisham-Brown, J., Hemmeter, M. L., & Pretti-Frontczak, K. (2005). Blending practices for teaching young children in inclusive settings. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Guess, D., Roberts, S., & Guy, B. (1999). Implications of behavior state for the assessment and education of students with profound disabilities. In A. C. Repp & R. H. Horner (Eds.), Functional analysis of problem behavior: From effective assessment to effective support (pp. 338-394). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

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  • Hallahan, D. P., Lloyd, J. W., & Stoller, L. (1982). Improving attention with self-monitoring. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Learning Disabilities Research Institute.

  • Halle, J. W., Ostrosky, M. M., & Hemmeter, M. L. (2006). Functional communication training. In R. A. McCauley & M. Fey (Eds.), Treatment of language disorders in children: Conventional and controversial treatments. (pp. 509-545). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Harris, J. C. (1992). Neurobiological factors in self-injurious behavior. In J. K. Luiselli, J. L. Matson, & N. N. Singh (Eds.), Self-injurious behavior: Analysis, assessment, and treatment (pp. 59-92). New York: Springer-Verlag.

  • Hawken, L. S., Adolphson, S. L., Macleod, S., & Schumann, J. (2008). Secondary-tier interventions and supports. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. Horner (Eds.), Handbook of positive behavior support (pp. 395-420). New York: Springer.

  • Heller, K. A., Holtzman, W. H., & Messick, S. (Eds.) (1982). Placing children in special education: A strategy for equity. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

  • Hemmeter, M. L., & Fox, L. (2008). Supporting teachers in promoting children's social competence and addressing challenging behavior. In P. J. Winton, J. A. McCollum, & C. Catlett (Eds.), Practical approaches to early childhood professional development: Evidence, strategies, and resources (pp. 119-142). Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

  • Hieneman, M., Childs, K., & Sergay, J. (2006). Parenting with positive behavior support: A practical guide to resolving your child's difficult behavior. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Hieneman, M. & Dunlap, G. (1999). Issues and challenges in implementing community-based behavioral support for two boys with severe behavioral difficulties. In J. R. Scotti & L. H. Meyer (Eds.), Behavioral intervention: Principles, models, and practices (pp. 363-384). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Holburn, S. & Vietze, P. M. (2002). Person centered planning: Research, practice, and future directions. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Horner, R. H., Albin, R. W., Sprague, J. R., & Todd, A. W. (2000). Positive behavior support. In M. E. Snell & F. Brown (Eds.), Instruction of students with severe disabilities (5th ed.) (pp. 207-243). Columbus, OH: Merrill.

  • Horner, R. H., Close, D. W., Fredericks, H. D. B., O’Neill, R. E., Albin, R. W., Sprague, J. R., ... Heathfield, L. T. (1996). Supported living for people with profound disabilities and severe problem behaviors. In D. H. Lehr & F. Brown (Eds.), People with disabilities who challenge the system (pp. 209-240). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Horner, R. H., Dunlap, G., Beasley, J., Fox. L., Bambara, L., Brown, F., Walker, H. (2005). Positive support for behavioral, mental health, communication, and crisis needs. In K. C. Lakin & A. Turnbull (Eds.), National goals and research for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (pp. 93-107). Washington DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Horner, R. J., Sprague, J. R., & Flannery, K. B. (1993). Building functional curricula for students with severe intellectual disabilities and severe problem behaviors. In R. Van Houten, & S. Axelrod (Eds.), Behavioral analysis and treatment (pp. 47-71). New York: Plenum.

  • Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., Todd, A. W., & Lewis-Palmer, T. (2005). Schoolwide positive behavior support. In L. M. Bambara & L. Kern (Eds.). Individualized supports for students with problem behaviors (pp. 359-390). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Horner, R. H., Vaughn, B. J., Day, H. M., & Ard, W. R. (1996). The relationship between setting events and problem behavior: Expanding our understanding of behavioral support. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 381-402). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Howell, K., & Nolet, V. (2000). Curriculum-based evaluation: Teaching and decision making. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

  • Hughes, C., & Hwang, B. (1996). Attempts to conceptualize and measure quality of life. In R. L. Schalock (Ed.), Quality of life: Vol. 1. Conceptualization and measurement (pp. 51-61). Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

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  • Ikeda, M., Grimes, J., Tilly III, W. D., Allison, R., Kurns, S., & Stumme, J. (2002). Implementing an intervention-based approach to service delivery: A case example. In M. R. Shinn, G. Stoner & H. M. Walker (Eds.), Interventions for academic and behavioral problems II (pp. 53-70). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.

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  • Janney, R., & Snell, M. E. (2000). Teacher's guides to inclusive practices: Behavioral support. Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Jokinen, N. S., & Brown, R. I. (2010). Family quality of life and older-aged families of adults with an intellectual disability. In R. Kober, (Ed.), Enhancing the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities (pp. 279-303). New York: Springer.

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  • Kame'enui, E. J., & Carnine, D. W. (1998). Effective teaching strategies that accommodate diverse learners. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

  • Kame'enui, E. J., & Simmons, D. C. (2002). Planning and evaluation tool for effective schoolwide reading programs-Revised (PET-R). Eugene, OR: Institute for the Development of Educational Achievement.

  • Kavale, K. A. & Forness, S. R. (1999). Effectiveness of special education. In C. R. Reynolds & T. B. Gutkin (Eds.), The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed.), (pp. 984-1024). New York: Wiley.

  • Keith, K. D., & Schalock, R. L. (Eds.) (2000). Cross-cultural perspectives on quality of life. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

  • Kennedy, C. H., & Itonken, T. (1996). Social relationships, influential variables, and change across the life span. In L. K. Koegel, R. L. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 287-304). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Kennedy, C. H., & Thompson, T. (2000). Health conditions contributing to problem behavior among people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. In M. L. Wehmeyer, & J. R. Patton, (Eds.), Mental retardation in the 21st century (pp. 211-231). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

  • Kern, L., & Clarke, S. (2005). Antecedent and setting event interventions. In L. Bambara & L. Kern (Eds.), Individualized supports for students with problem behaviors (pp. 201-36). New York: Guilford Press.

  • Kern, L., & Dunlap, G. (1999). Assessment-based interventions for children with emotional and behavioral disorders. In A. C. Repp & R. H. Horner (Eds.), Functional analysis of problem behavior: From functional assessment to effective support. Monterey, CA: Brooks.

  • Kern, L. & Kokina, A. (2008). Using positive reinforcement to decrease challenging behavior. In J. K. Luiselli, D. C. Russo, & W. P. Christian (Eds.): Effective practices for children with Autism: Educational and behavior support interventions that work. New York: Oxford Press.

  • Kern, L., Sokol, N. G., & Dunlap, G. (2006). Assessment of antecedent influences on challenging behavior. In J. K. Luiselli (Ed.), Antecedent assessment and intervention: Supporting children and adults with developmental disabilities in community settings (pp. 53-72). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Kincaid, D. (1996). Person-centered planning. In L. Koegel, R. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. 439-465). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Kincaid, D., Chapman, C., Shannon, P., Schall, C., & Harrower, J. (2002). Families and the Tri-State Consortium for positive behavior support: A unique collaboration for people with challenging behavior. In J. Luschyn, G. Dunlap, & R. Albin (Eds.), Families and positive behavior support: Addressing problem behaviors in family contexts (pp.309-328). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Kincaid, D. & Fox, L. (2002). Person centered planning and positive behavior support. In S. Holburn & P. M. Vietze (Eds.), Person centered planning: Research, practice, and future directions (pp. 29 50). Baltimore: Brookes.

  • Knoff, H. M. (2001). The stop and think social skills program teacher's manual. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.

  • Koegel, L. K., Koegel, R. L., & Dunlap, G. (1996). Positive behavioral support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

  • Koegel, R. L., Carter, C. M., & Kern Koegel, L. (1999). Setting events to improve parent-teacher coordination and motivation for children with Autism. In J. K. Luiselli & M. J. Cameron (Eds.), Antecedent control: Innovative approaches to behavioral support (pp. 167-186). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

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